Start Consolidating p24

Consolidating p24

The C-87 transport derivative served as a longer range, higher capacity counterpart to the Douglas C-47 Skytrain.

After company executives including President Reuben Fleet visited the Boeing factory in Seattle, Washington, Consolidated decided instead to submit a more modern design of its own.

with the twin tail design from the Consolidated Model 31 flying boat, together on a new fuselage.

Due to its range, it proved useful in bombing operations in the Pacific, including the bombing of Japan.

Long range anti-submarine Liberators played an instrumental role in closing the Mid-Atlantic Gap in the Battle of the Atlantic.

The single fin did appear in production on the PB4Y Privateer derivative.

was built around two central bomb bays that could accommodate up to 8,000 pounds (3,600 kg) of ordnance in each compartment (but rarely did, as this decreased range and altitude).

This new fuselage was intentionally designed around twin bomb bays, each one being the same size and capacity of the B-17 bomb bays.

In January 1939, the USAAC, under Specification C-212, formally invited Consolidated to submit a design study for a bomber with longer range, higher speed and greater ceiling than the B-17.

It also had a lower ceiling and was less robust than the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress.

While aircrews tended to prefer the B-17, General Staff favored the B-24, and procured it in huge numbers for a wide variety of roles.

At nearly 19,000 units, with over 8,000 manufactured by Ford Motor Company, it holds records as the world's most produced: bomber; heavy bomber; multi-engine aircraft; and American military aircraft in history. It served in every branch of the American armed forces, as well as several Allied air forces and navies, and saw use in every theater of operations.